Chief Executive Officer
Eastdil Secured

Roy March is the chief executive officer of Eastdil Secured, L.L.C., the leading real estate investment banking company in the United States.

He has more than 40 years of real estate experience at Eastdil Secured across financing, sales, acquisition, and capital markets activities in the United States, Europe, and East Asia.

Founded in 1967, Eastdil was the first real estate investment banking firm in the United States. Eastdil Secured is a wholly owned subsidiary of Wells Fargo Bank, one of the largest financial service companies in the world and the largest commercial real estate lender in the U.S. In 2009, as a result of the Wells Wachovia merger, the real estate investment banking division of Wachovia was moved to Eastdil Secured forming the first comprehensive end to end real estate banking investment platform in the industry. The New York based firm was involved in over $1.9 trillion in transactions from 2007.

Roy serves on various industry, corporate and community boards, is a Trustee of the Urban Land Institute, is past Chairman of the Advisory Board of the Samuel Zell and Robert Lurie Real Estate Center at The Wharton School at The University of Pennsylvania, the Board of Directors of Real Estate Roundtable and was on the Board of Directors for Pension Real Estate Association (PREA). He is also a member of NAREIT – the National Association of Real Estate Investment Trusts, and the International Council of Shopping Centers. He was past president of the Friends of Malibu Urgent Care, serves on the board of The Painted Turtle, a summer camp for children with chronic or life-threatening illnesses. He is on the Executive Campaign Committee for Union Rescue Mission in Los Angeles, an organization to end homelessness and serves the homeless population in Los Angeles, and is co-founder of March to the Top-Africa.

Speaking at the Following:

Feb 6

Wednesday, February 6, 2019

Trends in Capital Markets

3.55PM – 4.55PM
Royal Lancaster London

With caution entering the markets as the end of the cycle looks ever closer, where are investors finding value around the globe? And how does such a competitive market impact on fees and margins? How will investors hedge against potential interest rate rises and an uncertain geopolitical backdrop for investing? As the provision of affordable housing rises up the agenda, along with a focus on social as well as financial value, what appetite do investors have for this style of investing and how does it fit with their fiduciary responsibilities?